30daysofocean

Photos /Videos on hashtag 30daysofocean (410)

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258 1 Jun 20, 2015
Hahtag #30daysofocean: It

It's the last day of ! Hawksbill , like this one, are found in the waters of National Marine Sanctuary. They may be relatively small sea turtle, but they're hungry -- an adult hawksbill sea turtle eats an average of 1,200 pounds of sponges a year! (Photo: GP Schmahl/NOAA) #30DaysOfOcean

60 0 Nov 24, 2015
Hahtag #30daysofocean: This is what happens when you

This is what happens when you're taking photos and then the sea decides to come in real quick 😂 30 days in the ocean still going strong, having a love affair with the Pacific. 📷: #30daysofocean

292 9 Jun 29, 2016
Hahtag #30daysofocean: The ocean is never still. Whether observing from

The ocean is never still. Whether observing from the beach or a boat, we expect to see waves on the horizon. Waves are created by energy passing through water, causing it to move in a circular motion. However, water does not actually travel in waves. Waves transmit energy, not water, across the ocean and if not obstructed by anything, they have the potential to travel across an entire ocean basin. Learn more in our Ocean Facts at oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts fact #30DaysofOcean

709 0 May 31, 2017
Hahtag #30daysofocean: Join us for 30 Days of the Ocean

Join us for 30 Days of the Ocean from June 1-30. We'll share an ocean fact every day on topics like microplastics, hydrography, sea turtles, the depth of the ocean, and more. There's sure to be a fact for everyone! This image shows a sea anemone surrounded by Pocillopora, Porites, and giant clams at Kingman Reef in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. fact life #30DaysofOcean

549 1 Jun 1, 2017
Hahtag #30daysofocean: How ocean savvy are you? We

How ocean savvy are you? We're kicking off 30 days of ocean facts in the month of June. Tune in every day for your daily does of ocean trivia. First question - how many 'oceans' are there? Answer: There is only one global ocean. While there is only one global ocean, the vast body of water that covers 71 percent of the Earth is geographically divided into distinct named regions. The boundaries between these regions have evolved over time for a variety of historical, cultural, geographical, and scientific reasons. Historically, there are four named oceans: the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Arctic. However, most countries - including the United States - now recognize the Southern (Antarctic) as the fifth ocean. The Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian are known as the three major oceans. This image shows a Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument Mokumanamana sunset. Image credit: James Watt/NOAA #30DaysofOcean fact

429 0 Jun 2, 2017
Hahtag #30daysofocean: Why is the #ocean blue? It

Why is the blue? It's because water absorbs colors in the red part of the light spectrum. Like a filter, this leaves behind colors in the blue part of the light spectrum for us to see. The ocean may also take on green, red, or other hues as light bounces off of floating sediments and particles in the water. Most of the ocean, however, is completely dark. Hardly any light penetrates deeper than 656 feet, and no light penetrates deeper than 3,280 feet. #30DaysofOcean

393 2 Jun 3, 2017
Hahtag #30daysofocean: Just how deep is the ocean?? The average

Just how deep is the ocean?? The average ocean depth is 2.3 miles or 3.7 kilometers. The deepest part of the ocean is called the Challenger Deep and is located beneath the western Pacific Ocean in the southern end of the Mariana Trench, which runs several hundred kilometers southwest of the U.S. territorial island of Guam. Challenger Deep is approximately 36,200 feet deep. It is named after the HMS Challenger, whose crew first sounded the depths of the trench in 1875. This image shows a Spanish Dancer, a type of sea cucumber, hovering at 9,150 feet near the Davidson Seamount off the coast of California. That's 1.7 miles down! depth fact #30DaysofOcean trivia

408 0 Jun 6, 2017
Hahtag #30daysofocean: A tide gauge, which is one component of

A tide gauge, which is one component of a modern water level monitoring station, is fitted with sensors that continuously record the height of the surrounding water level. This data is critical for many coastal activities, including safe navigation, sound engineering, and habitat restoration and preservation. While older tide-measuring stations used mechanical floats and recorders, modern monitoring stations use advanced acoustics and electronics. Today's recorders send an audio signal down a half-inch-wide "sounding tube" and measure the time it takes for the reflected signal to travel back from the water's surface. Data is collected every six minutes, but while the old recording stations used mechanical timers to tell them when to take a reading, a satellite controls the timing on today’s stations. Shown here: a NOAA tide station near San Francisco. #30DaysofOcean

591 3 Jun 7, 2017
Hahtag #30daysofocean: You

You're looking at a pool of super-saline water visible in a channel leading away from a brine seep in Flower Garden Bank National Marine Sanctuary Why is the ocean salty, anyways? The rain that falls on the land contains some dissolved carbon dioxide from the surrounding air. This causes the rainwater to be slightly acidic due to carbonic acid (which forms from carbon dioxide and water). As the rain erodes the rock, acids in the rainwater break down the rock. This process creates ions, or electrically charged atomic particles. These ions are carried away in runoff to streams and rivers and, ultimately, to the ocean. Many of the dissolved ions are used by organisms in the ocean and are removed from the water. Others are not used up and are left for long periods of time where their concentrations increase over time. Two of the most prevalent ions in seawater are chloride and sodium. Together, they make up over 90 percent of all dissolved ions in the ocean. Sodium and Chloride are 'salty.' #30DaysofOcean

10 0 Oct 19, 2017
11 2 Oct 18, 2017
81 6 Oct 2, 2017

There is a lot of disconnection from the environment in today's world and too often we are too quick to point the finger at others - at corporates, our peers, farmers, the lady next door....it's always someone elses fault. All that this does is perpetuate blame, isolation and even more disconnection. We create more of the problem we wanted to 'fix'. "Fixing" implies something is "broken" - which it isn't. The world is just a reflection of us. The best thing we can do to create more connection to our earth is to actually reconnect ourselves. By doing this, we are contributing to the connection, not disconnection. This is my main motivation for #30daysofocean. Today was Day 6 - a bit impromptu this morning but nice to immerse alongside a friend 🐳💙🌊🌏

21 1 Jul 20, 2017

Our Nation's Ports are the lifelines of Our Economy. In 2016, Foreign Trades through U.S. Ports were valued in the Trillions. $475 billion Exports and $1.0 trillion Imports. 14% of U.S. counties that are adjacent to the coast produce 45% of this Nation's gross domestic product (GDP), with close to providing 3 million jobs . Imagine that ... #30daysofocean

119 3 Jul 3, 2017

My friends are better than your friends #4thofjulyweekend🇺🇸💥

2 1 Jun 30, 2017

・・・ Brush up on your ocean etiquette! Here are some simple marine wildlife viewing guidelines. Help us spread the word! - Learn before you go. Read about the wildlife, viewing sites, and local regulations to get the most from your wildlife viewing experience. - Keep your distance. Use binoculars, spotting scopes, and cameras with zoom lenses to get a closer look. - Hands off. Never touch, handle, or ride marine wildlife. Touching wildlife, or attempting to do so, can injure the animal, put you at risk, and may also be illegal for certain species. - Do not feed or attract wildlife. Feeding or attempting to attract wildlife with food, decoys, sound, or light disrupts normal feeding cycles, may cause sickness or death from unnatural or contaminated food items, and habituates animals to people. - Never chase or harass wildlife. Never completely surround the animal, trap an animal between a vessel and shore, block its escape route, or come between mother and young. - Stay away from wildlife that appears abandoned or sick. Some marine animals, such as seals, leave the water or are exposed at low tide as part of their natural life cycle—there may be nothing wrong with them. If you think an animal is in trouble, contact local authorities for advice or report it to the NOAA Fisheries stranding network. #30DaysofOcean

431 0 Jun 30, 2017

Brush up on your ocean etiquette! Here are some simple marine wildlife viewing guidelines. Help us spread the word! - Learn before you go. Read about the wildlife, viewing sites, and local regulations to get the most from your wildlife viewing experience. - Keep your distance. Use binoculars, spotting scopes, and cameras with zoom lenses to get a closer look. - Hands off. Never touch, handle, or ride marine wildlife. Touching wildlife, or attempting to do so, can injure the animal, put you at risk, and may also be illegal for certain species. - Do not feed or attract wildlife. Feeding or attempting to attract wildlife with food, decoys, sound, or light disrupts normal feeding cycles, may cause sickness or death from unnatural or contaminated food items, and habituates animals to people. - Never chase or harass wildlife. Never completely surround the animal, trap an animal between a vessel and shore, block its escape route, or come between mother and young. - Stay away from wildlife that appears abandoned or sick. Some marine animals, such as seals, leave the water or are exposed at low tide as part of their natural life cycle—there may be nothing wrong with them. If you think an animal is in trouble, contact local authorities for advice or report it to the NOAA Fisheries stranding network. #30DaysofOcean

464 5 Jun 28, 2017

What is a sea cucumber? It's not a vegetable, it's an animal. Found only in salt water, more than a thousand species of sea cucumbers exist around the world. These squishy invertebrates are echinoderms, making them distant relatives to starfish and urchins. Unlike starfish or sea urchins, the bodies of sea cucumbers are covered with soft, leathery skin instead of hard spines. If you ever encounter a sea cuke and it feels threatened, you could be in for a surprise. Some sea cucumbers shoot sticky threads at their enemies, entangling and confusing predators. Others can violently contract their muscles and shoot some of their internal organs out of their rear ends. The missing body parts are quickly regenerated. Most sea cucumbers are scavengers, moving along the seafloor and feeding on tiny particles of algae or microscopic marine animals collected with tube feet that surround their mouths. The particles they grind down to smaller pieces are further broken down by bacteria and become part of the ocean’s nutrient cycle. This is a similar role to that which earthworms perform on land. Seen in this image, a chocolate chip sea cucumber found at Johnston Atoll. #30DaysofOcean life fact

1494 31 Jun 27, 2017

Are all fish cold-blooded? Not all fish are cold-blooded. In 2015, researchers with the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center revealed the opah, or moonfish, as the first fully warm-blooded fish. Although not as warm as mammals and birds, the opah circulates heated blood throughout its body, giving it a competitive advantage in the cold ocean depths from 150 to 1,300 feet below the surface. In this image, fisheries biologist Nicholas Wegner of NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, California, lead author of a 2015 research paper that discovered the unique warm-blooded characteristics of the opah. life #30DaysofOcean

134 9 Jun 27, 2017

American Shoals Lighthouse from the of at 500' _travelogue

46 0 Jun 27, 2017

Green Barrel Sea Squirt (Didemnum molle) . These colonial tunicates feed by taking in water through the buccal siphons (tiny side holes), filtering out plankton and organics, and exhaling wastewater through the atrial siphon (big top hole). This is a form of "suspension feeding" - essentially the same process by which baleen whales eat! . #30daysofocean

891 11 Jun 26, 2017

The Portuguese man o’ war, (Physalia physalis) is often called a jellyfish, but is actually a species of siphonophore, a group of animals that are closely related to jellyfish. A siphonophore is unusual in that it is comprised of a colony of specialized, genetically identical individuals called zooids — clones — with various forms and functions, all working together as one. Each of the four specialized parts of a man o’ war is responsible for a specific task, such as floating, capturing prey, feeding, and reproduction. Found mostly in tropical and subtropical seas, men o' war are propelled by winds and ocean currents alone, and sometimes float in legions of 1,000 or more! Resembling an 18th-century Portuguese warship under full sail, the man o’ war is recognized by its balloon-like float, which may be blue, violet, or pink and rises up to six inches above the waterline. Lurking below the float are long strands of tentacles and polyps that grow to an average of 30 feet and may extend by as much as 100 feet. The tentacles contain stinging nematocysts, microscopic capsules loaded with coiled, barbed tubes that deliver venom capable of paralyzing and killing small fish and crustaceans. While the man o’ war’s sting is rarely deadly to people, it packs a painful punch and causes welts on exposed skin. Beachcombers be warned: The stalwart man o’ war may still sting you even weeks after having washed ashore. Image credit: Elizabeth Condon, National Science Foundation life #30DaysofOcean fact

465 5 Jun 26, 2017

Do you know what a whale fall is? The ocean's depths are supplied by nutrients falling down from the surface waters. When whales die and sink, the whale carcasses, or whale falls, provide a sudden, concentrated food source and a bonanza for organisms in the deep sea. Different stages in the decomposition of a whale carcass support a succession of marine biological communities. Scavengers consume the soft tissue in a matter of months. Organic fragments, or detritus, enrich the sediments nearby for over a year. The whale skeleton can support rich communities for years to decades, both as a hard substrate (or surface) for invertebrate colonization and as a source of sulfides from the decay of organic compounds of whale bones. Microbes live off of the energy released from these chemical reactions and form the basis of ecosystems for as long as the food source lasts. At deep sea levels this forms a new food web and provides energy to support single- and multi-cell organisms and sponges, thus adding to the ocean's food chain. This image shows a whale fall community, including bacteria mats, clams in the sediments, crabs, worms, and a variety of other invertebrates. The 35-ton gray whale carcass originally settled on the seafloor at 1,674 meters depth in 1998. This photo was taken six years later. life #30DaysofOcean

55 2 Jun 25, 2017

Here's wishing everyone a day 25 of #30daysofocean in my not fully successful #30daychallenge ... !

21 3 Jun 24, 2017
412 2 Jun 24, 2017

Can you spot the difference between a seal and sea lion? Seals and sea lions are marine mammals called 'pinnipeds' that differ in physical characteristics and adaptations. Sea lions (on the left of this image) are brown, bark loudly, "walk" on land using their large flippers and have visible ear flaps. Seals have small flippers, wriggle on their bellies on land, and lack visible ear flaps. Seals are quieter, vocalizing via soft grunts. ion life #30DaysofOcean

429 0 Jun 23, 2017

What is upwelling? Winds blowing across the ocean surface push water away. Water then rises up from beneath the surface to replace the water that was pushed away. This process is known as “upwelling.” Upwelling occurs in the open ocean and along coastlines. The reverse process, called “downwelling,” also occurs when wind causes surface water to build up along a coastline and the surface water eventually sinks toward the bottom. Water that rises to the surface as a result of upwelling is typically colder and is rich in nutrients. These nutrients “fertilize” surface waters, meaning that these surface waters often have high biological productivity. Therefore, good fishing grounds typically are found where upwelling is common. #30DaysofOCean Shown here: This image from NASA’s Earth Observatory shows sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean along the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Mexico, observed by satellite in 2005. The purplish swirl of color near the center of the image indicates an area of cooler water. In the winter, strong winds blow from the Gulf of Mexico, across the isthmus, and out over the Gulf of Tehuantepec. The winds are so strong that they drive the surface waters of the ocean away from the shore. Cold water from deeper in the ocean wells up to replace it.

105 6 Jun 22, 2017

This wind needs to stop! I need a boat day!

286 1 Jun 21, 2017

Today for we look at what an inch of water is worth. Our nation’s ports are the lifelines of our economy. In 2016, foreign trades through U.S. ports were valued at $1.5 trillion—$475 billion exports and $1.0 trillion imports were moved by vessels. When goods travel through ports, it means they are traveling via ship. NOS is in the business of making sure that mariners—and the goods they are transporting—make it to their destinations safely and quickly. Just as airplane pilots need to know current weather and ground conditions, ship captains need to know exactly what's going on in the water and in the air. NOS monitoring systems supply mariners with the real-time data they need, providing information such as water levels, wind and current speeds and directions, and water temperature. But what does this have to do with that inch of water? A ship needs a certain amount of water in order to float and not touch bottom. This water depth is called the ship’s “draft.” The more cargo a ship carries, the more the ship will weigh, meaning it will sink more and require more draft. Even a slight decrease in the depth of a waterway will require a ship to reduce the amount of cargo it is carrying. On the flipside, more water means more cargo. This, in turn, translates into fewer trips needed to transport goods. With one more inch of draft, a ship can transport an additional: - 36 John Deere tractors, worth more than $2.4 million - 9,600 laptop computers, valued at $8.5 million - 358,000 pounds of wheat, worth more than $30,000 - 1,540 55-inch televisions, worth approximately $3 million #30DaysofOcean

4 0 Jun 21, 2017

・・・ Today's ocean trivia--how much of the ocean have we explored? The ocean is the lifeblood of Earth, covering more than 70 percent of the planet's surface, driving weather, regulating temperature, and ultimately supporting all living organisms. Throughout history, the ocean has been a vital source of sustenance, transport, commerce, growth, and inspiration. Yet for all of our reliance on the ocean, 95 percent of this realm remains unexplored, unseen by human eyes. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research is leading efforts to explore the ocean by supporting expeditions to investigate and document unknown and poorly known areas of the ocean. These expeditions represent a bold and innovative approach by infusing teams of scientist-explorers with a "Lewis and Clark" spirit of discovery and equipping them with the latest exploration tools. From mapping and describing the physical, biological, geological, chemical, and archaeological aspects of the ocean to understanding ocean dynamics, developing new technologies, and helping us all unlock the secrets of the ocean, NOAA is working to increase our understanding of the ocean realm. #30DaysofOcean exploration

47 2 Jun 21, 2017

Closed Brain Coral (Symphyllia spp.) . Why is this coral red? Corals couldn't survive without housing a symbiotic algae (called zooxanthellae) inside of their tissue. The mix of pigments determines a coral's color and are usually "chosen" for functional reasons - for example, we think pink and purple corals are sunscreened against damaging UV rays. . #30daysofocean

7 0 Jun 21, 2017

・・・ Feeling a bit stuck today? Today's ocean fact explore the nautical term--doldrums--that sailors around the world know for getting stuck on windless waters. Known to sailors around the world as the doldrums, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, (ITCZ, pronounced and sometimes referred to as the “itch”), is a belt around the Earth extending approximately five degrees north and south of the equator. Here, the prevailing trade winds of the northern hemisphere blow to the southwest and collide with the southern hemisphere’s driving northeast trade winds. Due to intense solar heating near the equator, the warm, moist air is forced up into the atmosphere like a hot air balloon. As the air rises, it cools, causing persistent bands of showers and storms around the Earth’s midsection. The rising air mass finally subsides in what is known as the horse latitudes, where the air moves downward toward Earth’s surface. Because the air circulates in an upward direction, there is often little surface wind in the ITCZ. That is why sailors well know that the area can becalm sailing ships for weeks. And that’s why they call it the doldrums. fact #30DaysofOcean

27 1 Jun 21, 2017

・・・ Historic shipwrecks. Colorful coral reefs. Amazing marine wildlife. NOAA's national marine sanctuaries and estuarine research reserves offer all this and more to diving enthusiasts in coastal U.S. states and territories. NOAA sanctuaries and reserves are protected areas that help us conserve these special coastal and marine places for future generations, while still enjoying all they have to offer today. Diving is just one of many recreational opportunities available at our these sites. A few tips to help you safely enjoy your diving adventure: -Don't collect underwater souvenirs. Leave these behind for others to enjoy. -Enjoy viewing marine mammals and wildlife from a safe distance. -If you see corals, please don't touch. Keep your fins, gear, and hands away from coral reefs, as this contact can hurt you and will damage delicate coral animals. For more on safe diving practices, visit http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/may14/diving.html. In this photo, divers in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. life #30DaysofOcean

34 0 Jun 20, 2017

What's under the sea? #30daysofocean

476 2 Jun 20, 2017

Feeling a bit stuck today? Today's ocean fact explore the nautical term--doldrums--that sailors around the world know for getting stuck on windless waters. Known to sailors around the world as the doldrums, the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, (ITCZ, pronounced and sometimes referred to as the “itch”), is a belt around the Earth extending approximately five degrees north and south of the equator. Here, the prevailing trade winds of the northern hemisphere blow to the southwest and collide with the southern hemisphere’s driving northeast trade winds. Due to intense solar heating near the equator, the warm, moist air is forced up into the atmosphere like a hot air balloon. As the air rises, it cools, causing persistent bands of showers and storms around the Earth’s midsection. The rising air mass finally subsides in what is known as the horse latitudes, where the air moves downward toward Earth’s surface. Because the air circulates in an upward direction, there is often little surface wind in the ITCZ. That is why sailors well know that the area can becalm sailing ships for weeks. And that’s why they call it the doldrums. fact #30DaysofOcean

581 0 Jun 20, 2017

Historic shipwrecks. Colorful coral reefs. Amazing marine wildlife. NOAA's national marine sanctuaries and estuarine research reserves offer all this and more to diving enthusiasts in coastal U.S. states and territories. NOAA sanctuaries and reserves are protected areas that help us conserve these special coastal and marine places for future generations, while still enjoying all they have to offer today. Diving is just one of many recreational opportunities available at our these sites. A few tips to help you safely enjoy your diving adventure: -Don't collect underwater souvenirs. Leave these behind for others to enjoy. -Enjoy viewing marine mammals and wildlife from a safe distance. -If you see corals, please don't touch. Keep your fins, gear, and hands away from coral reefs, as this contact can hurt you and will damage delicate coral animals. For more on safe diving practices, visit http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/may14/diving.html. In this photo, divers in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. life #30DaysofOcean

546 1 Jun 19, 2017

Today's ocean trivia--how much of the ocean have we explored? The ocean is the lifeblood of Earth, covering more than 70 percent of the planet's surface, driving weather, regulating temperature, and ultimately supporting all living organisms. Throughout history, the ocean has been a vital source of sustenance, transport, commerce, growth, and inspiration. Yet for all of our reliance on the ocean, 95 percent of this realm remains unexplored, unseen by human eyes. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research is leading efforts to explore the ocean by supporting expeditions to investigate and document unknown and poorly known areas of the ocean. These expeditions represent a bold and innovative approach by infusing teams of scientist-explorers with a "Lewis and Clark" spirit of discovery and equipping them with the latest exploration tools. From mapping and describing the physical, biological, geological, chemical, and archaeological aspects of the ocean to understanding ocean dynamics, developing new technologies, and helping us all unlock the secrets of the ocean, NOAA is working to increase our understanding of the ocean realm. #30DaysofOcean exploration

35 1 Jun 19, 2017

Giddyup #30daysofocean

611 7 Jun 18, 2017

Have you ever wondered what an oceanographer does? Oceanography covers a wide range of topics, including marine life and ecosystems, ocean circulation, plate tectonics and the geology of the seafloor, and the chemical and physical properties of the ocean. Just as there are many specialties within the medical field, there are many disciplines within oceanography. - Biological oceanographers and marine biologists study plants and animals in the marine environment. They are interested in the numbers of marine organisms and how these organisms develop, relate to one another, adapt to their environment, and interact with it. - Chemical oceanographers and marine chemists study the composition of seawater, its processes and cycles, and the chemical interaction of seawater with the atmosphere and seafloor. Their work may include analysis of seawater components, the effects of pollutants, and the impacts of chemical processes on marine organisms. - Geological oceanographers and marine geologists explore the ocean floor and the processes that form its mountains, canyons, and valleys. Through sampling, they look at millions of years of history of sea-floor spreading, plate tectonics, and oceanic circulation and climates. - Physical oceanographers study the physical conditions and processes within the ocean such as waves, currents, eddies, gyres and tides; the transport of sand on and off beaches; coastal erosion; and the interactions of the atmosphere and the ocean. #30DaysofOcean ographer jobs

28 5 Jun 18, 2017

[📷: ; seahorse caught & released from R/V ANGARI in Tampa Bay by Oceanography Camp for Girls] via . . . sunday andi 2017 atsea #30daysofocean

60 2 Jun 18, 2017

It's a bit of a stretch, but I'm combine #30daysofocean , and with one of my totally real and non-fictional role models. to all those fabulous pops out there!

47 0 Jun 18, 2017

Sabían que los desechos plásticos en el océano causan la muerte de 1 millón de aves marinas y más de 100,000 animales marinos cada año? (Fuente: UNESCO) Toda esta basura la encontré caminando a lo largo de no más de 500m de playa. Llené 2 bolsas de súper (que eran también parte de la basura en la arena) de desechos de todo tipo, principalmente plástico. Es preocupante que no nos demos cuenta que cualquier daño a la naturaleza, tarde o temprano, será en perjuicio de nuestra propia existencia. Por favor, seamos conscientes del respeto que debemos a la naturaleza. Hagamos que nuestra interacción con ella sea algo positivo y no algo destructivo. Cuántas vidas de otras especies van a seguir costando sus descuidos? person #30daysofocean

62 1 Jun 18, 2017

These are not islands. They're underwater patch reefs as seen from my airplane window. On a clear day, anyone can distinguish basic reef areas from 28,000 feet above the ocean - it's easy to see why NASA is interested in looking at them through a satellite. . #30daysofocean

43 2 Jun 18, 2017

Endangered sea turtles, dolphins, whales, and other marine life trapped in fishing nets will no longer be protected. #30daysofocean

35 4 Jun 17, 2017

Day 3- Final day with the College of Marine Science Oceanography Camp for Girls onboard R/V ANGARI. Our crew thoroughly enjoyed participating in this program and sharing our passion for the oceans with such an enthusiastic group of girls and mentors! . . education girls #30daysofocean

14 1 Jun 17, 2017

with ・・・ Did you know sonar uses sound waves to 'see' underwater? Sonar, short for Sound Navigation and Ranging, is helpful for exploring and mapping the ocean because sound waves travel farther in the water than do radar and light waves. NOAA scientists primarily use sonar to develop nautical charts, locate underwater hazards to navigation, search for and map objects on the seafloor such as shipwrecks, and map the seafloor itself. This image shows a sunken car that was found by Ocean Surveys, Inc., one of NOAA Coast Survey’s contract vessels, while surveying in Jamaica Bay, New York, in response to Super Storm Sandy. #30DaysofOcean

444 2 Jun 17, 2017

Did you know sonar uses sound waves to 'see' underwater? Sonar, short for Sound Navigation and Ranging, is helpful for exploring and mapping the ocean because sound waves travel farther in the water than do radar and light waves. NOAA scientists primarily use sonar to develop nautical charts, locate underwater hazards to navigation, search for and map objects on the seafloor such as shipwrecks, and map the seafloor itself. This image shows a sunken car that was found by Ocean Surveys, Inc., one of NOAA Coast Survey’s contract vessels, while surveying in Jamaica Bay, New York, in response to Super Storm Sandy. #30DaysofOcean

42 1 Jun 16, 2017

Crown-of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci) . Despite what you've probably heard, coral-eating starfish are a healthy component of coral reefs. They tend to eat the fastest growing corals, which creates space for the slower ones to expand their colonies. This contributes to species diversity! It's only when a reef experiences a starfish outbreak that we find over-predation and excessive coral death. This outbreak cycle is currently only known to occur every 17 years. . #30daysofocean

47 3 Jun 16, 2017

Day 2 of the College of Marine Science Oceanography Camp for Girls is in the books! The weather was beautiful and we were able to sample three stations while giving these young oceanographers lots of experience with the ! . . . vessel ography 2017 atsea #30daysofocean

35 0 Jun 15, 2017

Cuttlebone (Sepiidae) . Cuttlefish use this chambered internal bone to control their buoyancy. The design imposes habitat limitations - if the cephalopod swims too deep, the calcified shell can implode due to hydrostatic pressure. My guy found this one while beach-combing the sands of Lizard Island, Australia. . #30daysofocean

481 3 Jun 15, 2017

It's day 15 of our #30DaysofOcean and we're wondering -- have you ever heard of a "dead zone"? Not to be confused with "The Twilight Zone"...a dead zone is a more common term for hypoxia, which refers to a reduced level of oxygen in the water. Less oxygen dissolved in the water is often referred to as a “dead zone” because most marine life either dies, or, if they are mobile such as fish, leave the area. Habitats that would normally be teeming with life become, essentially, biological deserts. Hypoxic zones can occur naturally, but scientists are concerned about the areas created or enhanced by human activity. There are many physical, chemical, and biological factors that combine to create dead zones, but nutrient pollution is the primary cause of those zones created by humans. Excess nutrients that run off land or are piped as wastewater into rivers and coasts can stimulate an overgrowth of algae, which then sinks and decomposes in the water. The decomposition process consumes oxygen and depletes the supply available to healthy marine life. Dead zones occur in many areas of the country, particularly along the East Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Great Lakes, but there is no part of the country or the world that is immune. The second largest dead zone in the world is located in the U.S., in the northern Gulf of Mexico. fact

12 1 Jun 15, 2017

♻️🌎🌊🐋💕 ( ) ・・・ Today's fact explores microplastics. Plastic is the most prevalent type of marine debris found in our ocean and Great Lakes. Plastic debris can come in all shapes and sizes, but those that are less than five millimeters in length (or about the size of a sesame seed) are called “microplastics.” Microplastics come from a variety of sources, including from larger plastic debris that degrades into smaller and smaller pieces. In addition, microbeads, a type of microplastic, are very tiny pieces of manufactured polyethylene plastic that are added as exfoliants to health and beauty products, such as some cleansers and toothpastes. These tiny particles easily pass through water filtration systems and end up in the ocean and Great Lakes, posing a potential threat to aquatic life. Microbeads are not a recent problem. According to the United Nations Environment Programme, plastic microbeads first appeared in personal care products about fifty years ago, with plastics increasingly replacing natural ingredients. As recently as 2012, this issue was still relatively unknown, with an abundance of products containing plastic microbeads on the market and not a lot of awareness on the part of consumers. This image shows microplastics observed during the 2014 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands marine debris removal mission. #30DaysofOcean fact

37 0 Jun 15, 2017

Just a little water today for day 14 of #30daysofocean and ... I was traveling today so a bit busy for anything more time involved, but here's something! 💦💧💦

37 2 Jun 15, 2017

Awesome day on the water with College of Marine Science's Oceanography Camp for Girls! Sediment sampling, water collection, plankton tows, trawls... The girls and staff were rock stars! Looking forward to Day 2 tomorrow and many more photos to come. . . . vessel ography biology atsea 2017 #30daysofocean

501 3 Jun 14, 2017

Today's fact explores microplastics. Plastic is the most prevalent type of marine debris found in our ocean and Great Lakes. Plastic debris can come in all shapes and sizes, but those that are less than five millimeters in length (or about the size of a sesame seed) are called “microplastics.” Microplastics come from a variety of sources, including from larger plastic debris that degrades into smaller and smaller pieces. In addition, microbeads, a type of microplastic, are very tiny pieces of manufactured polyethylene plastic that are added as exfoliants to health and beauty products, such as some cleansers and toothpastes. These tiny particles easily pass through water filtration systems and end up in the ocean and Great Lakes, posing a potential threat to aquatic life. Microbeads are not a recent problem. According to the United Nations Environment Programme, plastic microbeads first appeared in personal care products about fifty years ago, with plastics increasingly replacing natural ingredients. As recently as 2012, this issue was still relatively unknown, with an abundance of products containing plastic microbeads on the market and not a lot of awareness on the part of consumers. This image shows microplastics observed during the 2014 Northwestern Hawaiian Islands marine debris removal mission. #30DaysofOcean fact

39 2 Jun 14, 2017

The Sea Turtle has been living on Earth since the time of the dinosaurs- 110 million years and are now ENDANGERED. #30daysofocean

58 2 Jun 14, 2017

Pajama Cardinalfish (Sphaeramia nematoptera) . Cardinalfish are "mouthbrooders," the term used when male marine species carry eggs around in their mouth until hatching day. This means they don't eat (sometimes for weeks on end) and spend time spitting out and sucking back in a few eggs at a time to keep the unhatched babies moving around. It's estimated that 30% of the eggs are lost or accidentally eaten. . #30daysofocean

16 0 Jun 13, 2017

#30DaysOfGratitude to celebrate the village of , , and community that have helped grow.⠀ ⠀ Day 12 (catch-up): Thank you for keeping our local waters clean! We have had so much fun spreading the Good with you over the years. And thanks for organizing these great events this month so we all can help be a #30DaysOfOcean - with , , Marine Resources Division, , ⠀ We've got several volunteer opportunities coming up this month including a cleanup with A Taste of Gullah & a reef construction with South Carolina Department of Natural Resources SCORE Program! Find out more: http://buff.ly/2sm2te8

32 2 Jun 13, 2017

Ta da! New winch and cable installed and ready to go for the Thank you to Florida Institute of Oceanography for all of their assistance in helping us get ready and gear loaded. . . ography education vessel life 2017 atsea #30daysofocean

20 0 Jun 13, 2017

#30DaysOfGratitude to celebrate the village of , , and community that have helped grow.⠀ ⠀ Day 11 (catch-up): In keeping with our #30DaysOfOcean theme…Thank you - Marine Resources Division Marine Education Program for rocking the and sharing your . And thank you SCORE Community-based Oyster Restoration Program . Learn more about the awesome June 20th, special behind the scenes DNR Fort Johnson Marine Lab Tour -- with Julie Binz, Ben Dyar ( ) ⠀ Friends in the Charleston area: Go behind the scenes at the laboratory where SCDNR marine biologists study everything from algae to sea turtles and sharks! Join us on June 20, 2017 for a monthly lab tour at the Marine Resources Division on James Island. Please pre-register for the event by following the link below, as space is limited. Participants will get a first-hand look at the working laboratories used by biologists every day to manage our marine resources. The tour will last approximately one hour and will be most appropriate for adults and kids in middle school and up. Pre-registration is required. WHEN: 10 AM on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 REGISTER: http://buff.ly/2rsEUfw

350 3 Jun 13, 2017

Today's ocean fact of the day...What are beach advisories and beach closures? Beach advisories and beach closures occur when water testing reveals the presence of one or more contaminants that exceed healthy standards. A beach advisory leaves it up to users as to whether they wish to risk going into the water. In the case of a beach closure, the state and/or local government decides that water conditions are unsafe for swimmers and other users. How can beach-goers avoid the disappointment of arriving at their summer vacation destination only to find that authorities advise them not to swim there or that the beaches are closed altogether? Unfortunately, there is no central database that provides information on beach closures and advisories in real time. The best way to find information on the current water quality of a particular beach is to plan ahead. In some cases, warning signs will be posted to alert people of the potential risk of illness from contact with the water. Signs may be placed for short-term problems or more permanent ones, when, for example, repeated monitoring indicates ongoing contamination. Shown here: Coastal areas within the National Park Service's Golden Gate National Recreational Area in San Francisco Bay, California, were closed to visitors during the Cosco Busan oil spill in 2007. #30DaysofOcean fact

85 10 Jun 13, 2017

knocked today's theme out of the park. "Black and Bright" which is something we see quite often here in the Florida Keys. This is a throwback to Saturday night on the Seaplane Basin _forum_1930 _travelogue _projectanarchy #30daysofocean

56 1 Jun 13, 2017

Back to it on day 13 of #30daysofocean for my #30daychallenge in ... always remind me of the so here's this happy critter for today's

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