okeanosexplorer

Photos /Videos on hashtag okeanosexplorer (819)

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2 0 Jan 21, 2018

A particularly grumpy-looking ophidiiform cusk eel encountered at a depth of 1,585 meters (5,200 feet) during Dive 12 https://goo.gl/QYPf5s

37 1 Jan 21, 2018

: via ··· “ A look back at 2017 octopods wouldn't be complete without a dumbo! While exploring an unnamed seamount within the Winslow Reef Area, Phoenix Islands Protected Area, we saw this dumbo octopus resting on the seafloor before it took off, gliding through the water as if flying, propelled by the fins behind its eyes. Happy ! . . octopus

774 15 Jan 20, 2018

"Now Who's Got The Bigger Feet?" - This amazing footage was filmed on location while exploring Kelvin Seamount at a depth of ~2,050 meters (6,725 feet) using the Okeanos Deepsea ROV courtesy of NOAA Ocean Exploration - Check out this video of a sea star using its tube feet to "glide" across the seafloor. And can you spot the little brittle star trying to get out of the way?! Seen during the Okeanos Explorer Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts 2014 Expedition. - Wild, huh? When exploring the deep using remotely operated vehicles, we often capture behaviors that we wouldn't otherwise get to observe. - 🔵The movement of starfish is guided by their senses of touch and sight. There are five 'eyes', light-sensitive cushions, one at the end of each arm. These and the tube feet are connected to nerve fibres, so these animals are more complex than might appear. Although starfish started off as filter-feeders, they evolved to become major predators of shell-fish (the brachiopods and bivalves). They can also eat small crustacea and fish. Their tube feet developed suckers, perhaps originally to improve movement. Later, they were used to open shell-fish. "Suckered tube feet may not have been present in any Palaeozoic sea star". The shells of brachiopods and bivalves are held together by strong muscles. What the starfish does is clamp hold of them on either side with its tube feet, and apply a steady pull. The starfish, with its muscles and hydraulicsystem, can pull for much longer than any bivalve muscle can withstand. Apparently, ten minutes are usually enough to open the shell a bit. Then the starfish slips its stomach inside the shell. The stomach can get through a slot as narrow as 0.1mm. The starfish then dissolves the mollusc where it lives, absorbing the nutrients. This digestion process takes much longer than opening the shell, perhaps a couple of days. Some species swallow the shell whole, and dissolve the contents inside. - 🌊 🌊 💙 🌎 Global🌎

35 1 Jan 19, 2018

: via ··· “ may be done diving for 2017, but there's still lots of deep-diving goodness to share! Check out this video of a shortfin squid (genus Illex) that inked the remotely operated vehicle! Click on the link in our bio for more! . . Explorer

29 2 Jan 18, 2018

( ) ・・・ Check out this video of a sea star using its tube feet to "glide" across the seafloor. And can you spot the little brittle star trying to get out of the way?! . Seen during the Okeanos Explorer Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts 2014 expedition, while exploring Kelvin Seamount at a depth of ~2,050 meters (6,725 feet). . Wild, huh? . When exploring the deep using remotely operated vehicles, we often capture behaviors that we wouldn't otherwise get to observe. . .

1219 22 Jan 18, 2018

Check out this video of a sea star using its tube feet to "glide" across the seafloor. And can you spot the little brittle star trying to get out of the way?! . Seen during the Okeanos Explorer Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts 2014 expedition, while exploring Kelvin Seamount at a depth of ~2,050 meters (6,725 feet). . Wild, huh? . When exploring the deep using remotely operated vehicles, we often capture behaviors that we wouldn't otherwise get to observe. . .

519 11 Jan 18, 2018

Applications for the Okeanos Explorer-in-Training program are due TOMORROW (January 19, 2018). . This program is open to current or recent undergraduate and graduate students interested in gaining experience using an advanced multibeam bathymetric sonar mapping system, while contributing in a significant way to the Okeanos Explorer ocean exploration mission. . Learn more here: https://go.usa.gov/xnvsz. . .

840 10 Jan 17, 2018

Remember that one time (last month...) in the Gulf of Mexico, when set out to explore a suspected shipwreck and instead found a 40-foot shipping container and its contents of washing machines, freezers, and such?! . While not the shipwreck we were expecting, the dive provided valuable information. Identification markings found on the container may help to track it, which could provide a maximum date as to when observed animals colonized these structures, allowing us to estimate growth rates of sessile organisms. The dive also served as a reminder that, even in the deep ocean, humans can have an impact. . It also highlights how little we know about our deep ocean and how much we have left to explore and learn. We're looking forward to getting back down there this Spring! Check out the link in our bio for more. . . Explorer

15 0 Jan 17, 2018

( ) ・・・ Sometimes, you just don't want to come out and face the day... . This giant isopod, Bathynomus giganteus, accompanied by a hitchhiking spider crab, was seen headfirst at its burrow tunnel at a depth of 545 meters (1,788 feet) in the Gulf of Mexico. . .

89 2 Jan 15, 2018

Nine 2017 RepostBy : "What would be without an alien invasion? This spectacular “cosmic” jelly was seen flying through the deep water column during exploration of “Utu” seamount, located in the northern region of the American Samoa Exclusive Economic Zone, at a depth of ~3,000 meters (1.86 miles) on February 21, 2017. . . " (via ) 2017 9 Nine

216 11 Jan 14, 2018

Creatures of the deep ocean are like no others on the planet. These Iridigorgia corals were filmed at a depth of 1,869 meters (6139 feet). Iridigorgia are soft corals that grow upwards in a spiral pattern. They are octocorals, with polyps arranged in groups of eight. _ Video from

855 2 Jan 11, 2018

A brisingid sea star rests on a small bubblegum coral in Hydrographer Canyon, off the U.S. northeast coast. . .

32 0 Jan 10, 2018

( ) ・・・ Sometimes, you just don't want to come out and face the day... . This giant isopod, Bathynomus giganteus, accompanied by a hitchhiking spider crab, was seen headfirst at its burrow tunnel at a depth of 545 meters (1,788 feet) in the Gulf of Mexico. . .

1459 9 Jan 10, 2018

Sometimes, you just don't want to come out and face the day... . This giant isopod, Bathynomus giganteus, accompanied by a hitchhiking spider crab, was seen headfirst at its burrow tunnel at a depth of 545 meters (1,788 feet) in the Gulf of Mexico. . .

939 13 Jan 8, 2018

During the first dive of the 2017 Discovering the Deep: Exploring Remote Pacific Marine Protected Areas expedition, we encountered this long-armed squid swimming in the water column along a steep slope off the western ridge of Swains Island, within National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa. . . Explorer

570 2 Jan 5, 2018

It's ! While the connection between "ocean exploration" and "birds" might not seem obvious, while at sea, we often do encounter feathered friends. Some may stop on to rest on our ship while on a long journey elsewhere and some we see when our activities take us closer to shore. . Aside from the enjoyment of seeing birds, we can learn from them. Seabirds are an important part of the marine ecosystem and knowing more about their distribution can help us identify important marine habitats. This information can then be used to develop models to better understand ecosystem changes, make informed management decisions, and help further conservation efforts. . . This brown noddy was seen during Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition. It had plucked what appeared to be a piece of algae from the water just offshore of Palmyra Atoll. . . Explorer

931 4 Jan 4, 2018

It's cold pretty much everywhere on the mainland U.S. today, but it's still kind of warm in Hawaii, so here's a throwback to 2015, when we encountered this splendid perch towards the top of a pinnacle feature along the southwest coast of Niihau. He doesn't look too thrilled to see us, huh? The 2015 Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawai’i expedition was the first in our multi-year campaign to collect data support science and management decisions in and around U.S. marine protected areas in the central and western Pacific. . . perch

97 9 Jan 4, 2018

This is awesome footage of a swordfish feeding 1700’ down!!👀⚔️⚔️ ( ) ・・・ Happy New Year, explorers! We had a great 2017 (like that time, less than a month ago, when we saw a swordfish feeding in the Gulf of Mexico at ~530 meters (1,740 feet) depth!!) and now we're ready for 2018. Check out the full plan for NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer for the upcoming year here: https://go.usa.gov/xnyaW . . #2017 #2018

465 7 Jan 2, 2018

Happy New Year, explorers! We had a great 2017 (like that time, less than a month ago, when we saw a swordfish feeding in the Gulf of Mexico at ~530 meters (1,740 feet) depth!!) and now we're ready for 2018. Check out the full plan for NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer for the upcoming year here: https://go.usa.gov/xnyaW . . #2017 #2018

1064 22 Jan 2, 2018

Happy New Year, explorers! We had a great 2017 (like that time, less than a month ago, when we saw a swordfish feeding in the Gulf of Mexico at ~530 meters (1,740 feet) depth!!) and now we're ready for 2018. Check out the full plan for NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer for the upcoming year here: https://go.usa.gov/xnyaW . . #2017 #2018

1433 33 Dec 29, 2017

"The Colour Purple" - This mesmerizing video of a graceful Purple Sea Cucumber was filmed on location at Fina Nagu Caldera D in the Marianas Region last year with the Okeanos Explorer courtesy of our friends in conservation at NOAA Ocean Exploration and shared to all of us by My Good Friend, Animal Rights Advocate, Conservationist and Environmentalist, Joyce - 🔵Sea cucumbers are echinoderms from the class Holothuroidea. They are marine animals with a leathery skin and an elongated body containing a single, branched gonad. Sea cucumbers are found on the sea floor worldwide. The number of holothurian (/ˌhɒləˈθjʊəriən, ˌhoʊ-, -ˈθʊər-/) species worldwide is about 1,717 with the greatest number being in the Asia Pacific region. Many of these are gathered for human consumption and some species are cultivated in aquaculture systems. The harvested product is variously referred to as trepang, bêche-de-mer or balate. Sea cucumbers serve a useful role in the marine ecosystem as they help recycle nutrients, breaking down detritus and other organic matter after which bacteria can continue the degradation process. Overexploitation of sea cucumber stocks in many parts of the world provided motivation for the development of sea cucumber aquaculture in the early 1980s. The Chinese and Japanese were the first to develop successful hatchery technology on Apostichopus japonicus, prized for its high meat content and success in commercial hatcheries. Using the techniques pioneered by the Chinese and Japanese, a second species, Holothuria scabra, was cultured for the first time in India in 1988. In recent years Australia, Indonesia, New Caledonia, Maldives, Solomon Islands and Vietnam have also successfully cultured H. scabra using the same technology, which has since been expanded to other species. - 🌊 🌊 💙 🌍 Global🌏 🌍 🎈 🙏 💕 💞 💙 🌏

322 1 Dec 29, 2017

Nature is amazing. From a graceful purple sea cucumber was observed swimming during a dive last year at Fina Nagu Caldera D, in the Marianas region. So many amazing things to see in the deep! _

1009 10 Dec 29, 2017

A look back at 2017 octopods wouldn't be complete without a dumbo! While exploring an unnamed seamount within the Winslow Reef Area, Phoenix Islands Protected Area, we saw this dumbo octopus resting on the seafloor before it took off, gliding through the water as if flying, propelled by the fins behind its eyes. Happy ! . . octopus

574 1 Dec 29, 2017

It's the last of 2017 -- perfect time to look back at some of our favorite eight-legged finds of the year! Here’s a fun one to commemorate the occasion, seen during the first dive of the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition, while exploring in the Aunuʻu Unit of National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa. . . Explorer #8legs 2017

954 12 Dec 28, 2017

As 2017 winds down, here’s a look back at some of the fish friends we met this year while exploring the Phoenix Islands Protected Area and the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument at depths ranging from 300 meters down to nearly 6,000 meters. Documenting fish at these varying depths can provide scientists with insights into the health and viability of an ecosystem. . . #2017

1323 12 Dec 26, 2017

A giant deep-sea isopod, Bathynomus giganteus, with an antipatharian whip coral, Stichopathes sp., in the foreground. Seen during the Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition. For more from the expedition, visit the link in our bio. . . Explorer

1788 17 Dec 26, 2017

Dive into the mysteries of the deep! While exploring at a depth of ~800 meters (2,625 feet) off of Hawaii, the team caught glimpses of a rare six gill stingray (Hexatrygon bickelli) as well as a lantern shark. Never know what you'll see while exploring! . . xplore Explorer . . Original post by: easy _easy _e

1410 25 Dec 23, 2017

Looks like someone could use some help getting into the holiday spirit! This particularly grumpy-looking ophidiiform cusk eel was encountered at a depth of 1,585 meters (5,200 feet), during Dive 12 of the Okeanos Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition. For a selection of highlight images from the expedition, visit the link in our bio. . . fish

1057 3 Dec 22, 2017

Happy holidays, explorers...and happy ! . .

57 3 Dec 22, 2017

Deep sea shark!! Seen on one of the dives of this last expedition of the NOAA research vessel Okeanos Explorer. The diving has finished and the boat, , and crew are back in port, but you can still watch highlights from the expedition: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/welcome.html Although not identified during the cruise, I am reasonably confident this is a species of dogfish (Squaliformes). The presence of spines on both dorsal fins as well as overall body shape suggest a member of Squalidae or Centriphoridae. Prints available on my website www.rittercraft.com. eries art ing ingart s

959 2 Dec 21, 2017

🌍👈🏻❤️ may be done diving for 2017, but there's still lots of deep-diving goodness to share! Check out this video of a shortfin squid (genus Illex) that inked the remotely operated vehicle! Click on the link in our bio for more! . . Explorer www.angelsofthesea.es

1071 9 Dec 21, 2017

may be done diving for 2017, but there's still lots of deep-diving goodness to share! Check out this video of a shortfin squid (genus Illex) that inked the remotely operated vehicle! Click on the link in our bio for more! . . Explorer

141 4 Dec 20, 2017

Check out this beauty (chimera), recently filmed in the Gulf of Mexico by . . . ・・・ Today (December 20) is the LAST dive of the Okeanos Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition! Today we will explore a site called "Horne Dome," which lies within a proposed Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. We should reach the seafloor at a depth of 1,050 meters (3,445 feet) around 9:10 am and stay down until 3:50 pm CST. You can watch the dive live by clicking on the link in our bio. While you wait for things to get underway, enjoy this unusual and adorable chimaera, seen on December 17, 2017, in the Gulf. . . . . .

57 1 Dec 20, 2017

Today is the last dive of the current expedition of the NOAA research vessel Okeanos Explorer! and crew have just reached bottom with the ROVs Deep Discoverer and Seirios. They are diving at a depth of 1,050 m in an area proposed to be a marine sanctuary. http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/welcome.html I still have a few amazing critters from this expedition yet to paint, including this deep sea dogfish. Check them out at www.rittercraft.com. eries art ing ingart

2409 16 Dec 20, 2017

🌍👈🏻❤️ Today (December 20) is the LAST dive of the Okeanos Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition! Today we will explore a site called "Horne Dome," which lies within a proposed Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. We should reach the seafloor at a depth of 1,050 meters (3,445 feet) around 9:10 am and stay down until 3:50 pm CST. You can watch the dive live by clicking on the link in our bio. While you wait for things to get underway, enjoy this unusual and adorable chimaera, seen on December 17, 2017, in the Gulf. . .

1785 25 Dec 20, 2017

Today (December 20) is the LAST dive of the Okeanos Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition! Today we will explore a site called "Horne Dome," which lies within a proposed Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. We should reach the seafloor at a depth of 1,050 meters (3,445 feet) around 9:10 am and stay down until 3:50 pm CST. You can watch the dive live by clicking on the link in our bio. While you wait for things to get underway, enjoy this unusual and adorable chimaera, seen on December 17, 2017, in the Gulf. . .

724 3 Dec 19, 2017

During today's dive at "Dauphin Dome," we plan to target a number of Bureau of Energy Ocean Management seismic anomalies on the west edge of the dome, to collect baseline information on the distribution and abundance of benthic fauna, including chemosynthetic communities and corals. We've just reached the seafloor ~1,950 meters (1.2 miles) depth and plan to be down here until around 3:30 pm CST, at which time we will conduct exploratory midwater transects. This is the second to last dive of the expedition, so be sure to tune in by clicking on the link in our bio. And speaking of chemosythetic communities, we saw this tubeworm, Lamellibrachia sp., during Dive 11 of the expedition. The red “feathers” of the anterior end of the worm are respiratory tentacles filled with hemoglobin-containing “blood.” The white structure is called an obturaculum and functions as a trapdoor that protects the opening when the worm withdraws into its tube. . .

77 0 Dec 18, 2017

RepostBy : "This sea cucumber, Enypniastes eximia, spends most of its time on the seafloor, feeding off of surface sediments; it can, however, swim if it wants to get somewhere more quickly or evade a predator. Common names for these holothurians include Spanish dancer and headless chicken monster. Seen during our Gulf of Mexico expedition, for which we are diving again today (December 18)! Click on the link in our bio to join us from ~9 am to 4 pm CST as we search for deep-sea corals! . . Explorer " )

1174 23 Dec 18, 2017

This sea cucumber, Enypniastes eximia, spends most of its time on the seafloor, feeding off of surface sediments; it can, however, swim if it wants to get somewhere more quickly or evade a predator. Common names for these holothurians include Spanish dancer and headless chicken monster. Seen during our Gulf of Mexico expedition, for which we are diving again today (December 18)! Click on the link in our bio to join us from ~9 am to 4 pm CST as we search for deep-sea corals! . . Explorer

906 4 Dec 17, 2017

We observed this king crab (Neolithodes agassizii), a major predator at Gulf of Mexico cold seeps, chowing down on a Bathymodiolus brooksi mussel during Dive 10 of the Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition. We’re diving RIGHT NOW, south of Louisiana, at a site called “Penchant Basin.” Join us live via the link in our bio! . .

919 4 Dec 16, 2017

During Dive 08 of the Gulf of Mexico expedition, we saw this hermit crab (Paguroidea sp.) with an anemone that substitutes for a shell. We're diving in the Gulf again today (December 16), exploring "Tunica Mound" at a depth of 350 meters (1,150 feet). We expect to be on the seafloor from approximately 9:00 am until 4:10 pm CST. Join us LIVE via the link in our bio! . . Explorer

47 0 Dec 14, 2017

RepostBy : "On December 9, 2017, the Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition the team explored a shipwreck known only as 'Wreck 15377.' The wreck was first identified from an oil and gas industry survey back in 2002, but had never been visually surveyed – until now. Learn more about initial observations from this dive: go.usa.gov/xnnKg. And, if you like shipwrecks, you're in luck, as we'll be exploring another one today (December 14)! Today's dive will take us to "Wreck 15725," a previously unexplored shipwreck with accompanying debris field that are an estimated combined 125 meters (410 feet) long. During the dive, we will conduct a full visual survey of the wreck to look for diagnostic features and artifacts and to document the inhabiting biology. We expect to be on the seafloor from ~9:30 am to 3:30 pm CST, so click on the link in our bio to join us live for a first-ever look at the wreck site! . . Explorer " )

645 5 Dec 14, 2017

On December 9, 2017, the Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition the team explored a shipwreck known only as 'Wreck 15377.' The wreck was first identified from an oil and gas industry survey back in 2002, but had never been visually surveyed – until now. Learn more about initial observations from this dive: go.usa.gov/xnnKg. And, if you like shipwrecks, you're in luck, as we'll be exploring another one today (December 14)! Today's dive will take us to "Wreck 15725," a previously unexplored shipwreck with accompanying debris field that are an estimated combined 125 meters (410 feet) long. During the dive, we will conduct a full visual survey of the wreck to look for diagnostic features and artifacts and to document the inhabiting biology. We expect to be on the seafloor from ~9:30 am to 3:30 pm CST, so click on the link in our bio to join us live for a first-ever look at the wreck site! . . Explorer

657 6 Dec 13, 2017

To the backdrop of video highlights from exploration of a portion of the West Florida Escarpment known as "Smooth Escarpment Ridge," co-science lead for the Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition Dr. Diva Amon considers how this expedition sets the stage for follow-on research of our vast and unknown ocean... Join us later this morning (12/13/17) as we explore a geologically active area that may have a young mud volcano, an exposed salt dome, hydrocarbon seepage, and chemosynthetic communities, starting at a depth of 2,075 meters (1.29 miles) -- we expect to touch down on the seafloor around 9:40 am CST. Watch by clicking on the link in our bio. . . Explorer

300 2 Dec 13, 2017

Art&post by ・・・ Rhinochimaera! Just seen on the live feed of the current expedition of the NOAA research vessel Okeanos Explorer. Rhinochimaeras, or long-nosed chimaeras, are closely related to sharks and rays, having cartilaginous skeletons rather than bone. This particular individual was seen on a 2013 dive in the Atlantic. Check out the dive today, they’ve found brine pools in addition to the the chimaera that give the illusion of underwater lakes or rivers. http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/welcome.html Prints of this rhinochimaera are on my website, www.rittercraft.com. eries art ing ingart

44 0 Dec 12, 2017

Rhinochimaera! Just seen on the live feed of the current expedition of the NOAA research vessel Okeanos Explorer. Rhinochimaeras, or long-nosed chimaeras, are closely related to sharks and rays, having cartilaginous skeletons rather than bone. This particular individual was seen on a 2013 dive in the Atlantic. Check out the dive today, they’ve found brine pools in addition to the the chimaera that give the illusion of underwater lakes or rivers. http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/welcome.html Prints of this rhinochimaera are on my website, www.rittercraft.com. eries art ing ingart

483 1 Dec 12, 2017

This crinoid, or sea lily, may be the poorly known Monachocrinus caribbeus, the only member of its family, Bathycrinidae, previously recorded from the Gulf of Mexico. During the current Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition, we found large numbers of these crinoids in some areas attached to hard elevated substrates. It displays the parabolic filtration fan posture characteristic of most stalked crinoids, with arms curved back into the current and mouth oriented downcurrent (to right in this image). We're diving RIGHT NOW in the Gulf, so click on the link to join us as we explore at ~1,600 meters (one mile) below the ocean's surface. . . Explorer

16 0 Dec 11, 2017

Well, this has been cool as hell. explorer

11 0 Dec 11, 2017

Molten asphalt. Watching the live stream while I sip coffee. This is a great morning. explorer

743 4 Dec 11, 2017

is diving RIGHT NOW! We recently saw this squat lobster. For the dive today (Dec 11), we are exploring a site referred to as at "Henderson Ridge Mid South." During the dive, we will ascend a slope before proceeding along the steep side of a ridge on the way to the local high. The area shows high habitat suitability for deep-sea corals in models, so observations should support goals of NOAA's Southeast Deep Coral Initiative (SEDCI). We expect to be on the seafloor until 3:40 pm EST, so click on the link in our bio to tune in LIVE! . . Explorer

55 1 Dec 10, 2017

This particularly photogenic cusk eel in the family Ophidiidae was seen on one of the earlier dives of the current expedition of the NOAA research vessel, Okeanos Explorer. I was fascinated with its seemingly effortless movement and undulating dorsal and anal fins. It was this feeling of movement I wanted to capture in its illustration. Tune in to and crew as they are diving on suspected gas seeps today that likely harbor chemosynthetic organisms! https://youtu.be/fOdHf0doWdY Prints of these deep sea fishes are available on my website, www.rittercraft.com. eries art ing ingart

904 8 Dec 10, 2017

This Darwin’s slimehead was seen hanging out a few meters off the seafloor during the third dive of the Gulf of Mexico 2017 expedition. Good news, we're diving in the Gulf again today (December 10)!Today's dive target, "AT251," is a suspected a mud volcano with gas plumes that likely harbors chemosynthetic habitats. The summit of this feature is expected to have particularly interesting geology and biology. We'll start the dive at at ~2,100 meters (1.3 miles) depth and expect to be on the seafloor from ~12:30 pm - 5:10 pm EST. Join us LIVE via the link in our bio. . . Explorer

11 0 Dec 9, 2017

Inside the Mission Control Room during today's super-secret dive (only the location is secret....we are live streaming!)

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